Bill Ford shares vision for Corktown

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Phoebe Wall Howard, Detroit Free PressPublished 12:01 a.m. ET June 17, 2018 | Updated 11:40 a.m. ET June 17, 2018 Bill Ford Jr. talks about Ford buying the Michigan Central Station and his plans for its future Eric Seals, Eric Seals Buy Photo (Photo: Ryan Garza, Detroit Free Press) CONNECTTWEETLINKEDIN 16COMMENTEMAILMORE Day after day, Bill Ford drove his Mustang GT along Michigan Avenue between Dearborn and Detroit, past the graffiti-covered train station. And he started to wonder about his legacy, his family’s legacy and the future of Ford Motor Co. “I kept staring at the train station thinking, ‘What if? Wouldn’t…

Detroit train station is city’s biggest comeback moment yet

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John Gallagher, Detroit Free PressPublished 7:00 a.m. ET June 15, 2018 | Updated 8:23 a.m. ET June 15, 2018 FacebookTwitterGoogle+LinkedIn Michigan Central Station through its history  Fullscreen Buy Photo The new at the time lightweight diesel-Powered “Green Diamond” of the Illinois Central is shown to the public in 1936 at the Michigan Central station in Detroit. The engine was furnished by the Winton Engine division of General Motors.  Detroit Free Press archive Fullscreen 1 of 15 Next Slide 15 Photos Michigan Central Station through its history Buy Photo (Photo: Junfu Han, Detroit Free Press) CONNECTTWEETLINKEDIN 1COMMENTEMAILMORE Trying to sum up the…

Howes: Who says Chicago is business capital of Midwest?

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Daniel Howes , The Detroit News Published 11:30 p.m. ET Feb. 9, 2017 | Updated 9:03 a.m. ET Feb. 10, 2017 downtown-skylineBuy Photo (Photo: John T. Greilick / The Detroit News) Microsoft Corp.’s decision to move its regional headquarters to downtown Detroit from the suburbs has talking heads all atwitter. Why stop there? For the first time in who knows when, southeast Michigan and the reinventing city at its core can legitimately compete to become the regional headquarters of choice for the Midwest. That’s an honor for way too long owned by Chicago. Yes, the mind reels: Detroit, not Chicago….

Microsoft is taking its Detroit operation downtown

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Posted Feb 2, 2017 by Matt Burns (@mjburnsy) Next Story Snapchat paid Reggie Brown $157.5M to settle his ‘ousted founder’ lawsuit Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and businessman Dan Gilbert are set to announce Microsoft is moving downtown from the suburbs. TechCrunch has confirmed the move with several trusted sources and learned that Microsoft will occupy 50,000 square feet in One Campus Martius, a building owned in part by Dan Gilbert and home to a large chunk of the Quicken Loans team. Microsoft’s Detroit operation is currently housed in Southfield, Mich. The staff is mostly sales people. It’s unknown at this…

Construction builds up hope for Detroit’s 2017

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The Detroit News Published 10:33 p.m. ET Jan. 2, 2017 | Updated 8:47 a.m. ET Jan. 3, 2017 (Photo: Todd McInturf / The Detroit News) A string of major construction projects — from a massive hockey arena and street car line down Woodward to the resurrection of the Wayne County jail project — will reshape downtown Detroit in 2017. It’s a flurry of activity and investment that seemed wildly improbable less than a decade ago. But the construction detours and closed sidewalks are a welcome sign of a new era for many who live and work near downtown. “I’m excited…

Wojo: Pistons’ move more evidence of a city rebounding

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Detroit — It would’ve been easy, maybe even fiscally prudent, to ignore the allure. Tom Gores could’ve kept the Pistons right where they are, in a nice arena in a comfortable setting, far from the mounting noise. But Gores saw what others saw, and then heard what he had to hear. Growth begets growth, successful businessmen attract successful businessmen. And on a clear day in downtown Detroit, you could see more evidence of a rebound city increasingly united, in historic ways and symbolic ways. The Pistons are moving back downtown, which always made sense from a logistical standpoint, fitting the…

5 Detroit-based Startups That Emerged This Century

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By Greg DePersio | Updated January 12, 2016   For most of the 20th century, Detroit was the antithesis of a city whose economy was propelled by startups and small businesses. Huge corporations, most notably the Big Three automakers, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler, dominated the city. They provided, in one way or another, the majority of Detroit’s jobs and drove most of its growth throughout the century. During the later decades of the 1900s, however, out-of-control labor costs, increased competition from foreign automakers and other factors sent the Big Three reeling. Jobs were lost, profits dwindled and Detroit took…

Meridian: Downtown Detroit’s growth juggernaut

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Tom Walsh, Detroit Free Press Columnist 10:54 p.m. EST December 12, 2015 MERIDAN 120215 rhb4.jpg (Photo: Regina H. Boone / Regina H.Boone) They don’t yet have the prominence of a Dan Gilbert or the Ilitches – no sports team, no casino ownership – but the Cotton family’s Meridian Health Plan is fast emerging as Detroit’s next major high-growth, job-creating, family-run private enterprise. Since moving their primary Medicaid HMO business from Southfield to downtown Detroit, founder David Cotton, a medical doctor, and his three sons have grown it from 112 employees and revenue of $275 million in 2008, to 1,500 employees…

Top 5 Startups That Emerged in Detroit

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For most of the 20th century, Detroit was the antithesis of a city whose economy was propelled by startups and small businesses. Huge corporations, most notably the Big Three automakers, General Motors, Ford and Chrysler, dominated the city. They provided, in one way or another, the majority of Detroit’s jobs and drove most of its growth throughout the century. During the later decades of the 1900s, however, out-of-control labor costs, increased competition from foreign automakers and other factors sent the Big Three reeling. Jobs were lost, profits dwindled and Detroit took it on the chin, suffering more than any other…